Active Ingredient: A Conversation Between Trees

Data Visualisation

[image from Active Ingredient]

Over the next few months I’m going to be working with Active Ingredient to develop a dynamic sculpture for their project A Conversation Between Trees. The project combines environmental data gathered from trees in Nottingham’s Sherwood Forest and Brazil’s Mata Atlantica. This data from each location is then visualized (above image) side by side to illustrate the contrast between the two environments, and represent a form of conversation.

Here’s what they say about the project:

“Welcome to a forest that spans time and location… a journey from the temperate north to the tropical south to discover the invisible forces at play, to reveal a story of 150 years of climate and environmental change.”

A Conversation Between Trees connects trees in different environments, using sensors connected to mobile phones to visualize and interpret the sensor data, as part of a new locative artwork. Following on from research developed as part of the Dark Forest Project.

Active Ingredient will work with environmental sensors including CO2, temperature and humidity, to interpret the carbon cycle and the sensitivity of this process to climate change (carbon cycle feedback).  This will take place in forest and woodland environments in a series of locations.

The sculpture will join the work they have already developed for the up-coming series of exhibitions, and will offer an alternative to the data shown through the visualisations, giving a physical and accumulative representation of the contrasting environmental conditions, and the significance of the changing climates over time.

Human sensor data maps

[image from Active Ingredient]

Showing environmental data in ways that are meaningful to people, but still true it’s complexity, is extremely problematic. To find compelling ways of doing this Active Ingredient have undertaken several local community based exercises to map and visualise environmental data and the longer-term affects of climate change. One of these was a workshop with school children in Brazil [images above], where the children created data maps using felt to depict the environmental conditions as they perceived them:

As objects, data maps, they are quite beautiful, the colours, layout and style (to use the language of Robin Active Ingredient’s programmer) were simple yet evocative representions of the data they collected as ‘human sensors’.

I really like these data maps, and although they are highly personal representations, I think the intuition involved in making them and their highly evocative illustration also describes part of our approach to designing the installation. Simply, the idea to create something that changes and evolves to show abstract data, and the tensions and dialogues at work within, in compelling ways that people can immediately, and tangibly make sense of.

I’ll post more as things develop, but have a look through Active Ingredient’s website for more information and regular updates, including the exhibition dates and locations.

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