Camera Explora – Development

Tracing Mobility is almost over, it ends on the 12th, and it really has been a pleasure (if not a little intimidating) to be part of an exhibition with so much great work.

Above is an image of it in the gallery, and I’m really pleased with how it turned out. The maps on the wall are those created by people as they used the camera to explore Berlin. That was taken not long after the show opened, so hopefully by now there a few more.

Anyway, since its all up and running I thought I’d post up a few snippets of Camera Explora’s development.

 The Camera

The camera itself has more or less been completely rebuilt. We got hold of some android phones that are better able to cope with processing the images people take and logging co-ordinates to the server. Sam has also completely re-written the application so that its much more efficient. The UI is still very simple with just three main screens and relatively few ‘choices’. Applying constraints to digital technology is a big part of this project so we wanted strip out most of the functionality associated with digital photography, especially the ability to review and edit on the fly.

The camera’s body is a 3d printed case intended to make the smart phone feel a little bit more like a camera. This was again important to creating the desired experience of using a camera that does one job and relates to one experience of one place, rather than a smart phone that (excellent they may be) does everything.  This isn’t necessarily a comment over one being better than the other, more an attempts to find out what it means to have digital technologies that have a specific purpose. The casing also serves the functional purpose of blocking access to the phones buttons. This means means people cant exit the app and play with a free smart phone for a few hours.

 

The Plotter

The plotter draws lines with felt pen onto a map of the city. These lines don’t show your exact route, but instead draw lines between the locations where you take photos. This links the locations of things or events that you considered to be important, or worthy of attention, and therefore recording.

Because the pen only draws when you take a photograph, it rests in one place until another picture is taken. During this time the ink from the pen bleeds into the paper, so the size of the dot becomes a rough indicator of the length of time that passes between photos – or between paces and events of interest. The maps were custom made using open street map and printed on treated ink jet ready drawing paper.

The new version of the plotter is made using an A3 scanner. This gives you all the mechanical elements you need to run the x-axis, and is driven with a pretty standard 4-wire stepper motor so controlling it with an arduino and motor shield was quite straightforward. The mechanism involves a few drive wheels, belts and some wire + pulley systems that slow and smooth the movement of the stepper.

Flatbed scanners have no Y-axis, so I took the drive mechanism out of a smaller A4 scanner and attached it to the A3 scanner’s scan head using some custom made 3D printed brackets. The motor that came with this mechanism was a dc motor with an optical encoder on the back, rather than a stepper motor. These are really accurate, but unfortunately I couldn’t get a reading from the encoder – possibly why the scanner was being thrown out. Instead I got hold of a small stepper motor that could fit inside the  scan head along with the drive wheel of the smaller scanner mechanism.

This version of the plotter has a stand so that it could be displayed as a stand alone unit. I also wanted it to look and feel a bit more like a piece of furniture than last time.

Its build using plane old pine timber and plywood. But to make it look a little more like something that would belong in a home I covered it with oak veneer. I like how it turned out – it’s intentionally quite retro looking. This was partly to lend it a little domestic familiarity.

  

 

  

 

The Printer

As you walk around and take photos, a small photo printer hidden in the plotter display prints your photos. This happens as you take them.

The printer is a Polaroid Pogo. These are designed to work with mobile phones and certain camera with PictBridge functionality. It does this either by a usb connection to the camera or a bluetooth obex transfer. A PC won’t recognise these printers through a USB connection as it can’t run PictBridge, so the photos had to be sent over bluetooth.

The printer was held inside the plotter display casing by a 3d printed bracket. This means the printer can be easily slid in and out when the paper needs replacing, which, because they only hold 10 sheets, is quite often.


 

That’s a bit of a quick overview, but for the sake of brevity, that will do for now. Along with Sam who did all the android development, many thanks also go to Mike Golembewski and Rob Mitchelmore for help with various bits of software development.  It will soon be coming back from Berlin, and when it does i’ll get around to making a film about the project and post up some of the maps and photos that have been created.

I will also running some more controlled user trials for use in my PhD research. So if you’d like to have a go, get in touch!

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